Interesting Reads: Smart Hearing by Katherine Bouton

Katherine Bouton’s latest book, Smart Hearing — Strategies, Skills and Resources for Living Better with Hearing Loss, is just that — an excellent guide to living a better life with hearing loss. Using personal anecdotes and containing extensive research on assistive listening devices, the book provides a road map for people at all stages of their hearing loss journey. If you think you may have hearing loss, or know you do, this book is required reading.

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Hearing Loss: Slow Down, You Talk Too Fast

Don’t you sometimes wish the world would slow down a little bit. The racing from activity to activity, the constant barrage of emails and texts, even the hourly news cycle can be exhausting. No wonder people seem to be speaking at a faster and faster rate. Or maybe it just seems that way because of my hearing loss. Lately, I find that my brain needs a little extra processing time to help me hear my best. I have added “Please repeat that more slowly,” to my list of “What?” replacements.

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Hearing Loss & The Irony Of The Entertainment Business

“Goodbye yellow brick road,” Elton John belted out the title song of his final concert tour. My family rarely attends concerts — given my hearing loss I worry about damaging it further — but we are big Elton John fans and could not bear to miss our last chance to see him perform live. The sold out show in Madison Square Garden was outstanding with the crowd singing along to its favorite oldies but goodies. My family and I were able to enjoy the performance because we came prepared with hearing protection and the knowledge of how to use it. You can read my tips for attending a concert in my article, “How To Enjoy a Concert Safely When You Have Hearing Loss.”

As we made our way to our seats, the irony dawned on me. We were not allowed to smoke, to bring in outside food or drink, or even use caps on our plastic water bottles (I guess they think people will throw them?!?), but we could blast our ears with 110 decibel sound for 3 hours without any rules stating otherwise. There was not even a posted sign suggesting we protect our hearing with earplugs or ear muffs. Something seemed wrong with that.

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Getting Your Family On Your Hearing Loss Team

It feels like we talk about it all the time. “Please face me so I can hear you,” or “Can you repeat that slower,” but I sometimes wonder if it is sinking in. Objectively, I think my family knows what they need to do to help me hear, but it often slips their mind, or seems unimportant since in many cases, I function quite well. It’s not obvious that I need help, so when I do, they are not always there for me. Until recently. We had a formal family meeting about my hearing loss. It seemed to make a difference. My fingers are crossed that this momentum will continue.

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Why Audiologists Should Partner With Their Patients

This is the second article in a series I am writing for Ida Institute on person-centered care. The first article was about what person-centered care means to me — the hearing loss patient. This second article discusses the first tenet of person-centered care: Partner With Your Patient. I look forward to sharing the remaining articles with you. 

Below find an excerpt from the second article. To read the full article, click here. 

Living With Hearing Loss | A Hearing Loss Blog

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