Living With Hearing Loss Proudly Sponsors Open Captions on Broadway!

I love attending the theater, so there is no greater honor for Living With Hearing Loss than to sponsor the open captions at two recent Broadway shows presented by Theater Development Fund (TDF) — Hamilton and Miss Saigon. I hope there are many more open captioned performances coming for both shows. And others!

Through its TAP Accessibility Program, TDF supports numerous open captioned performances on and off-Broadway each year. You can find the list of current NYC offerings here. For other US cities click here. Tickets are available through its website for eligible members. You can join for free here. I try to attend as many shows as I can.

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Hearing Loss: My Miracle at the Eye Doctor

She placed the lens in front of my eye. The letters snapped to attention and I could suddenly read what had a second ago been blurry. It felt like a miracle. Perfect vision in the blink of an eye. If only my hearing were so easy to correct. But unfortunately, hearing aids are not yet like glasses.

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How To Survive A Public Restroom When You Have Hearing Loss

I have been flying a lot lately, which means plenty of time in airport bathrooms. Many have made huge strides in cleanliness and a large number are now more eco-friendly, but they have also gotten louder – dangerously so in some cases. 

If it is isn’t the deafening swoosh of the self-flushing toilets, it is the new high-speed hand dryers running perpetually. Both are high-pitched sounds, so for someone like me with relatively strong high-pitched hearing, the volumes are excruciating. What is a hearing aid wearing traveler to do? 

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What To Do When Nobody Can See Your Hearing Loss Struggle

I am proud to share my hearing loss story and tips on Mango Health

Any disability can be challenging in daily life, but one that is invisible creates additional obstacles. Being invisible can make it harder for people to be aware of your disability, to provide assistance without being asked, or even, in some cases, to take it seriously. Hearing health advocate Shari Eberts shares five suggestions that can help make your struggle more visible to improve your quality of life.

Living With Hearing Loss | A Hearing Loss Blog

“But, you don’t look like you have a hearing problem,” the gentleman said to me, from across the aisle. I had asked if he would mind switching seats with me in a crowded auditorium, so I could have a better view of the speaker. Given my hearing loss, I always do better if I can see the presenter’s mouth so I can lipread to fill in the things I miss by listening.

I stared at him in surprise. Did he expect my ears to be flashing red to indicate a problem? Or maybe they would have out of order signs hanging from them? Didn’t he realize that someone can’t look deaf?

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When Your Mother Has Hearing Loss

Your mother is always there for you. She loves you, before herself. She is your caregiver, confidant, and friend. She is always willing to lend an ear to your daily triumphs and concerns. But what if she can no longer hear you because of a hearing loss? How can you help her through this challenge so that you can both continue to enjoy your special relationship for many years to come? Here are my suggestions. Please share yours in the comments.

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