Should You Be Worried About Your Children’s Hearing?

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Can you hear your child’s music even though they are wearing headphones? Do they need to remove their earbuds to hear what you are saying to them? Are they listening to loud music for several hours a day? If one or more of these are true, your children could be damaging their hearing.

Enjoying music is part of growing up. Michael Jackson and Chicago formed the soundtrack for my teenage years as their music helped me express my emotions and put words to my self-discovery. I listened to music in the car, while I did homework, and wherever else I could. But listening to music on a Walkman or boombox is very different from listening to music today.

Earbuds put the sound much closer to the delicate structures of the inner ear and the compact size of today’s music makers (iPods, etc.) makes it easier to listen to music at any and all times. In fact, according to a 2015 Common Sense media study, teens consume an average of 9 hours of media daily, with listening to music as the most popular activity. That is a lot of Beyonce!

Why does this matter? Because it is damaging their hearing.

According to a 2010 study, one in five teens has hearing loss, and this number is likely higher today. Once hearing is damaged, the loss is permanent, and the impact on one’s life is great. I know, because I have hearing loss that started in my mid-20s. Mine is genetic, not noise-induced, but the impact is the same — missing the punch line of the joke when everyone else is laughing and having trouble communicating at work or at play. Feelings of isolation and depression are also commonly associated with hearing loss.

So what can we do? We need to educate children about the dangers of hearing loss, and we need to start teaching them well before the teenage years. Elementary school is perfect since this is when children are first developing the self-care habits they will use throughout life. Plus, they are a lot more open to adult advice about staying safe and healthy at that age than they will be in the teen years.

A few years ago I talked to my son’s 1st grade class about hearing — how it worked and how to protect it. I showed the children sound waves in water and helped them measure how loud different sounds were using a decibel reader. They were fascinated to see that the farther away you were from a sound, the quieter it became. I taught them the three steps to protecting their hearing — Move Away, Turn It Down and Block The Noise. At the end, I showed them how to use earplugs to protect their ears from loud noise. Each child got a pair to take home. Some of them still wear them.

The good news is that when hearing protection is used properly and music is consumed safely, noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable. We just need to get the word out. The materials are readily available through It’s A Noisy Planet, a program of the National Institutes of Health.

Readers, do you think schools should incorporate hearing loss prevention into the health curriculum?

A version of this post first appeared on Healthy Hearing.

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11 thoughts on “Should You Be Worried About Your Children’s Hearing?”

  1. Cathy – United States – My passion is writing and being a health advocate. The marriage of the two is what I've decided to do now during my "Second Chapter." My blog, An Empowered Spirit, is for people age 50+ who want to live a vibrant and healthy life. I am a writer for several health websites focusing on Multiple Sclerosis. I enjoy "paying it forward to others" as an MS Peer Advocate for Teva Neuroscience. I am happily married with one wonderful son and 3 adorable cats. I am crazy about classic black and white movies. My perfect weekend would be to hang out with Robert Osborne at the TCM Film Festival in Hollywood. I'll have to work on that.
    Cathy says:

    YES, I think schools should educate children about hearing loss while they’re young. Do any of the hearing associations send representatives to schools to educate students? Is this allowed or is there enough manpower? I think it’d be an educational opportunity worth looking into. And good for you for providing such an important lesson, Shari!

    1. Shari Eberts – NYC – Shari Eberts is a hearing health advocate, writer, speaker and avid Bikram yogi. She blogs at LivingWithHearingLoss.com and serves on the Board of Trustees of Hearing Loss Association of America. She is the former Board Chair of Hearing Health Foundation. Shari has an adult-onset genetic hearing loss and hopes that by sharing her story, it will help others to live more peacefully with their own hearing issues.
      Shari Eberts says:

      Noisy Planet does some in-school presentations, but they don’t have the manpower to be everywhere. I hope to encourage schools to get in on the act too. Thanks for your comment.

  2. Rena McDaniel – Boiling Springs – I love all things technical. Anything really. From the alarm clock, I took apart when I was six to the Plymouth Duster I rebuilt when I was only 16. I take it after my father, even though I lost him when I was only 15, he taught me not to be afraid to take chances, but to own up to my mistakes when they literally blew up in my face and they did... often.
    Rena McDaniel says:

    My granddaughter was born three months early and has hearing problems. We’ve been considering the cochlear implants, but not until she gets older. Right now, she has tubes in her ears. (She’s only two).

    1. Shari Eberts – NYC – Shari Eberts is a hearing health advocate, writer, speaker and avid Bikram yogi. She blogs at LivingWithHearingLoss.com and serves on the Board of Trustees of Hearing Loss Association of America. She is the former Board Chair of Hearing Health Foundation. Shari has an adult-onset genetic hearing loss and hopes that by sharing her story, it will help others to live more peacefully with their own hearing issues.
      Shari Eberts says:

      Is she using hearing aids too? Language development is so important at that young age. Best of luck to her and your family.

      1. Rena McDaniel – Boiling Springs – I love all things technical. Anything really. From the alarm clock, I took apart when I was six to the Plymouth Duster I rebuilt when I was only 16. I take it after my father, even though I lost him when I was only 15, he taught me not to be afraid to take chances, but to own up to my mistakes when they literally blew up in my face and they did... often.
        Rena McDaniel says:

        No they are taking a wait and see approach but we’ve noticed a big improvement since she has gotten the tubes. She never stops talking of course we only understand about 1/4 of it but thats normal at 2.

    1. Shari Eberts – NYC – Shari Eberts is a hearing health advocate, writer, speaker and avid Bikram yogi. She blogs at LivingWithHearingLoss.com and serves on the Board of Trustees of Hearing Loss Association of America. She is the former Board Chair of Hearing Health Foundation. Shari has an adult-onset genetic hearing loss and hopes that by sharing her story, it will help others to live more peacefully with their own hearing issues.
      Shari Eberts says:

      Thanks Russell

    1. Shari Eberts – NYC – Shari Eberts is a hearing health advocate, writer, speaker and avid Bikram yogi. She blogs at LivingWithHearingLoss.com and serves on the Board of Trustees of Hearing Loss Association of America. She is the former Board Chair of Hearing Health Foundation. Shari has an adult-onset genetic hearing loss and hopes that by sharing her story, it will help others to live more peacefully with their own hearing issues.
      Shari Eberts says:

      Thanks Carol!

    1. Shari Eberts – NYC – Shari Eberts is a hearing health advocate, writer, speaker and avid Bikram yogi. She blogs at LivingWithHearingLoss.com and serves on the Board of Trustees of Hearing Loss Association of America. She is the former Board Chair of Hearing Health Foundation. Shari has an adult-onset genetic hearing loss and hopes that by sharing her story, it will help others to live more peacefully with their own hearing issues.
      Shari Eberts says:

      So important for them to wear them, but it is hard to enforce. Keep at it! Thanks for your comment.

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