Hearing Loss: Why Audiologists Should Recommend Peer Support

Support is important for anyone facing a new challenge. Hearing loss is no different. Audiologists are often the first place people with hearing loss turn when searching for information about their condition. In my latest article for Ida Institute, I encourage audiologists to understand that the emotional aspects of hearing loss are equally important to treat. They can help do that by encouraging patients to seek out a hearing loss support group. I include an excerpt from the piece below. To read the full article click here

Hearing Loss Can Be A Solitary Pursuit

Like most people, I began my hearing loss journey alone, weighed down with stigma and unsure how to best navigate the world with hearing aids. I didn’t know any other people with hearing loss that I could ask for guidance. My father, bogged down with stigma of his own, was no real help. I often felt like I was on my own with this huge challenge, increasingly disconnected from family and friends that did not understand my struggles. Once I found my way to a hearing loss support group, this all changed.

Living With Hearing Loss | A Hearing Loss Blog

There, I met other people with hearing loss and realized that I was not alone. Many people suffered hearing loss exhaustion at the end of a long day of listening, found background noise debilitating and loud sounds painful. My hearing family never seemed to understand what I meant when I complained about those things.

Finding hearing loss peers showed me there was nothing shameful about hearing loss. I was amazed at the wonderful things other people with hearing loss were accomplishing in their lives. It gave me hope that I too could lead a dynamic and happy life despite my hearing loss.

Most importantly, I no longer felt alone with my hearing loss. I was now part of a community of people like me.

Click here to continue reading on Ida Institute.

Connect with us on Facebook and Twitter

Never miss a post! Click here to sign up for email alerts. 

 

6 thoughts on “Hearing Loss: Why Audiologists Should Recommend Peer Support

  1. Hi Shari

    Great blog. Here in the UK we have deaf clubs, but these are found mainly in larger tows and cities.

    I attend my local club and we have members across a wide age range, across the whole spectrum of levels of hearing loss from mild to those of us with severe and profound losses.

    Some members are new to hearing loss and some of us have been deaf for a long time.

    We all have different experiences and those of us who have lived with deafness for longer do offer support to those who are coming to terms to having been newly diagnosed with hearing loss and are just finding their way into the wide world of hearing aids, lip reading etc.

    It’s so important that clubs and groups exist in order to reduce the isolation effect that can come with deafness and hearing loss. They also provide an oasis where members can meet and be part of a deaf or hard of hearing world and get away from the struggles of trying to cope in the hearing world.

    Ian

  2. It’s also responsible for hearing loss individuals to communicate with audiologists of how support groups has be beneficial. In return, the specialist will encourage those who don’t belong to a support group to do so. I will be doing this the next time I see my Audiologist. On-line support groups has been instrumental in coping with this affiction that has plagued me for forty years. My next step is to meet people in a group setting to share experiences and exchange coping techniques.

  3. Thank you for your new posts they sure help! Gail

    On Tue, Jan 7, 2020, 6:33 AM Living With Hearing Loss wrote:

    > Shari Eberts posted: “Support is important for anyone facing a new > challenge. Hearing loss is no different. Audiologists are often the first > place people with hearing loss turn when searching for information about > their condition. In my latest article for Ida Institute, I enco” >

Leave a Reply