Why Audiologists Should Partner With Their Patients

This is the second article in a series I am writing for Ida Institute on person-centered care. The first article was about what person-centered care means to me — the hearing loss patient. This second article discusses the first tenet of person-centered care: Partner With Your Patient. I look forward to sharing the remaining articles with you. 

Below find an excerpt from the second article. To read the full article, click here. 

Living With Hearing Loss | A Hearing Loss Blog

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What is Person-Centered Care From the Patient’s Perspective?

I am proud to be writing a series of articles for Ida Institute on person-centered care. This first article is about what person-centered care means to me — the hearing loss patient. The next four articles will discuss each of the main tenets of patient-centered care in more detail. I look forward to sharing these articles with you over the next several months. 

I share an excerpt from the first article below. To read the full article click here

To hear a captioned recording of me talking about patient-centered care, click here

Living With Hearing Loss | A Hearing Loss Blog

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Over-The-Counter Hearing Aids — What Does the Potential Consumer Think?

I recently participated in an article for The Hearing Journal — the conclusion of its three part series on Over-The-Counter (OTC) hearing devices. Part 1 included perspectives from hearing health professionals. Part 2 shared views from hearing industry leaders. The third part was from the consumer perspective — people with mild to moderate hearing loss. I am happy to share the article below.

Living With Hearing Loss | A Hearing Loss Blog

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Podcast: Hearing Health Advocacy With Shari Eberts

I am thrilled to have been a guest on The Hearing Journal’s podcast series hosted by Clifford Olson, AuD. In it, I discuss how and why I got into hearing loss advocacy and provide suggestions to the audiologist community for how they can provide more patient centered care to people with hearing loss.

To listen to the podcast, click here.  The transcript (edited for easier reading) is below.

Living With Hearing Loss | A Hearing Loss Blog

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What This Hearing Aid Wearer Learned At An Audiology Conference

I am proud to share my hearing loss story and tips on Hearing Tracker

A Unique Opportunity

I was lucky to present recently at the American Academy of Audiology’s annual convention in Nashville held April 18-21, 2018. You can read about my presentation here. It was a fascinating experience to attend an audiology conference, not as an audiologist, but as a patient. It was interesting to attend the various educational sessions for the audiologists, listen in on the latest product launches from the hearing aid manufacturers, and walk the expansive exhibition hall to explore new and innovative products for people with hearing loss. I am so glad I attended.

Living With Hearing Loss | A Hearing Loss Blog

Positive take-homes from the AAA conference

1. Audiologists are genuinely concerned for our welfare. There were many sessions describing the details of patient-centered care in attempts to provide more personalized and effective hearing care for people with hearing loss. These talks were well attended and numerous questions were raised.

2. Over-the-counter (OTC) hearing devices are slowly being accepted. While there seemed to be push-back from some audiologists when the OTC hearing aid concept was first floated, most sessions at AAA 2018 seemed to regard OTC as a done deal. Attention was focused on how to best integrate OTC hearing aid wearers into an audiology practice, rather than rejecting the initiative entirely.

Click here to read more positives on Hearing Tracker. 

Negative take-homes from the AAA conference

1. Limited hearing assistance was offered. Few sessions were captioned or had listening assistive technology available. This was not surprising since the audience did not likely include many people with hearing issues, but making the options available would have shown respect for the people who did need them.

2. Poor communication habits were on display. At many of the sessions, questions were asked without using microphones and presenters did not repeat these questions before answering them. This is fairly typical at large meetings, but I had hoped for better from professionals whose job is focused on improving communication.

Click here to read more negatives on Hearing Tracker. 

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